Texas has two "route 66s:" the old US 66 and TX 66, which travels through Rockwall and Garland on its way to
Dallas. But the state highway is no where near as interesting as the Mother Road. Make sure to check out
Route 66's path through Oklahoma, too!
A brick building on 6th Street in Amarillo, the downtown section of Route 66. This building is original to the highway, having been built in 1926.
A cool cowboy on Amarillo Boulevard, the seedier side of Route 66.
The 1940s era Triangle Motel is pure Route 66, and is fairly intact. The name is apt, too: the complex sits at a traffic triangle.
Click here to go to Route 66 in Oklahoma!
Texas' Route 66
The Triangle Motel sits behind a chain link fence, but it still has all cabins, a big tree in the courtyard, and the great old neon sign.
Overgrown courtyard at the Triangle Motel
Questions or comments? E-mail me: robin@redriverhistorian.com
Glen Rio was completely bypassed by the interstate. It is still the last town in Texas before Route 66 enters New Mexico.
A brief glimpse into New Mexico on the abandoned section of Route 66.
Amarillo's very philosophical.
In 1926, Route 66 was not defined well at all. East of Amarillo it was both Highway 5 and Highway 75. West of Amarillo, Route 66 was simply
known as Highway 13. (Texas State Library and Achives)
By 1933, Route 66 was clearly marked, though it was not clearly paved west of Amarillo. Drivers were cautioned to "check road conditions during
wet weather." (Texas State Library and Archives)