There's nothing better than taking a road trip. But when
you've been driving on hot, dusty
roads or in the hot,
swampy backwaters, there's nothing better than stopping
at a way-side station to enjoy an ice cold drink and wolf
down a sandwich.

Old gas stations brands can often be discerned by their
architecture. Early Phillips 66 stations, for example, had
pitched roofs; during the Space Age, they sported large
windows and up-ward sloping overhangs. Humble Oil
stations were designed with beautiful tiles. Signs are dead
give-a-ways, too. Who doesn't know Mobile's Pegasus
and Texaco's star?
Clairemont, Kent County (TX )was once the county seat but is now a ghost
town. No one stops at this adobe station on US 380 anymore.
Hit the Road!
Red River Valley Gas
Stations
Like in history, today's gas stations not only sell gas but food and drinks as well.
Unlike yesteryear, however, most of the present stations do not have mechanics on
duty. Some have "inter-stated" themselves (yes, that's a word. Well, kind of): they
have become ubiquitous megaliths, like QuickTrips and RaceTracks and, heaven
forbid, Buckees. It's just a matter of time that the old service stations, like so many
places that hark to vintage Americana, will be swallowed up by multi-national
corporations. Here's a pictoral salute to these ancient relics of the automobile age.

Find more ancient gas stations in "Traveling History among the Ghosts."
Get your
copy today!

All photos, unless otherwise noted, were taken by Red River Historian
Pilot Point,
Texas
Childress,
Texas
Cloutierville,
Louisiana
Crossroads,
Arkansas
Davis,
Oklahoma
Dundee,
Texas
Glenrio,
Texas
(
Route 66)
Hollister,
Oklahoma
Hutchinson,
Louisiana
Italy,
Texas
(
U.S. 77)
Lehigh,
Oklahoma
McCaskill,
Arkansas
Medicine
Mound,
Texas
Natchitoches,
Louisiana
Olney,
Texas
Plain Dealing,
Louisiana
Powhattan,
Lousiana
Telephone,
Texas
Vinson,
Oklahoma
Wichita Falls,
Texas
Pauls Valley,
Oklahoma
Megargel,
Texas
Glenrio,
Texas
Cane River,
Louisiana
Bennington,
Oklahoma